sábado, 13 de agosto de 2016

Vito Acconci In honor of MoMA PS1’s show “Vito Acconci: Where Are We Now (Who Are We Anyway?), 1976,”

Installation view of “Vito Acconci: Where Are We Now (Who Are We Anyway?), 1976,” 2016, MoMA PS1. PABLO ENRIQUEZ/COURTESY ACCONCI STUDIO AND MOMA PS1
Installation view of “Vito Acconci: Where Are We Now (Who Are We Anyway?), 1976,” 2016, MoMA PS1.
PABLO ENRIQUEZ/COURTESY ACCONCI STUDIO AND MOMA PS1
In honor of MoMA PS1’s show “Vito Acconci: Where Are We Now (Who Are We Anyway?), 1976,” which looks at the first few years of the performance and video artist’s career, we turn back to 1972, when Acconci had one of his most famous shows, at Sonnabend Gallery in New York. At that exhibition, Acconci debuted Seed Bed, a performance in which he lay under a sloped floor he built in the gallery and masturbated to the thought of visitors above him. Below is April Kingsley’s review of the Sonnabend show. Last month, Phyllis Tuchman interviewed Acconci for these pages.
“Reviews and Previews”
By April Kingsley
March 1972
Vito Acconci’s disturbing exhibition was comprised of distinct performance situations and a film showing past performances. In Room A (Seed Bed) Acconci lay hidden beneath a room-sized, slanting plywood false-floor intoning words of love to the women walking over him, masturbating and moaning into a microphone. As a result the speaker became the focus of attention, while the false-floor functioned as a separation/protection device and as a metaphor for Acconci’s sexual fantasies. On one wall, white words on black panels poetically elucidated the nature of his activity for the viewer (as they did in the other performance rooms). While the activity in room A explored some aspects of sex—concentration, fantasy, exclusion, inclusion, shame, regression—room B was concerned with hate and fear, savagery, domination and resentment expressed through others while Acconci remained the passive object of these emotions. Room C involved the willing viewer-participant with the artist in an investigation of a whole range of emotions between the two poles of love and hate. Acconci, like many modern poets, uses the spoken word, the context and the physicality of his presence in tandem with intense psychological pressures to generate and structure a host of emotions in his viewer-listener. His work raises numerous questions about the nature of art: What is the expressive effect of the medium? What is its informational content? How intimate or self-revelatory can art be, and still be art and not life? Is all art a mirage, temporal, elusive and finally existing only in vague memories? Acconci’s work is not pure poetry: it involves theatre, encounter, sculpture, collage and drawing.

the ancient city of Heracleion was lost under the sea for good. Well 1200 years later, off the bay of Aboukir, this ancient city has finally been discovered. The city dates back to the 6th century B.C

OFF THE RECORD

What Scientists Just Found Deep In The Ocean Is Seriously Unbelievable. I’m Still In Shock!

Off the coast of Egypt divers have discovered something that was thought to be lost a long time ago.
It was said that the ancient city of Heracleion was lost under the sea for good.
Well 1200 years later, off the bay of Aboukir, this ancient city has finally been discovered.
The city dates back to the 6th century B.C. and holds some of the most beautiful artifacts you could imagine.
Things like grand statues of gods and goddesses standing well over 15 feet tall and carved out of red granite, treasures of gold and rare stones, elaborate temples and enormous tablets.
This find is enormous in the historical preservation community and has been commissioned by museums around the world.
Take a look at this incredible city found underwater.
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This is diver Franck Goddio examining the enormous hand carved statue of a pharaoh. This statue stands roughly 16 feet tall and was found near a large temple under the sea.
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Here is the head of a statue carved out of red granite depicting the god Hapi. Hapi is known as the god of the flooding of the Nile. Hapi is a symbol of abundance and fertility and has never been discovered at such a large scale before.
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The divers and their team of researchers carefully lift the statue to the surface in order to preserve and protect this piece of history. It will reside safely in a museum. 
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Here the pharaoh, the queen and the god Hapi are laid on the barge next to a temple stele. The stele dates back to the 2nd century B.C.. It was found broken into 17 pieces however all were found and placed back together.
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This gold plaque was found in the southern sector of the city. The text is written in Greek and acts as a signature for foundation deposits in the name of the king responsible for building this area. King Ptolemy III (246-222 B.C.)
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In the reflection of this divers mask we see a bronze statue of the god Osiris. The crown is the typical insignia of power and this statue has eyes adorned with gold sheets.
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Every single detail of this site in Aboukir Bay has been meticulously documented. Here a diver measures a red granite statues feet below the surface of the ocean.
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A bronze oil lamp in excellent condition. This dates back to the 2nd century B.C.
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Diver Franck Goddio showing off the size of this inscribed stele. This was ordered to be built by Nectanebo I sometime between 378 and 362 B.C. 
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The divers carefully lift the enormous stele out of the water where it has been for well over 1200 years. 
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Here the divers carefully inspect a stone full of gold fragments that date back to the 6th century B.C. I’m amazed that these are still in tact.
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This is a shallow gold saucer that was used for drinking and serving.
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This is an absolutely stunning statue found under the bay of a Ptolemiac queen. Most likely Cleopatra II or Cleopatra III dressed as the goddess Isis.
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This red granite statue was also found near the big temple of Heracleion and weighs a massive 4 tons.
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Here is a beautiful artifact, a Graeco-Egyptian statue of a queen carved out of dark stone.
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This is the head of a pharaoh statue being raised to the surface. The statue measures over 5 meters and was carved out of red granite.
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A bronze small figure of the pharaoh of the 26th dynasty found at a smaller temple in the underwater city of Heracleion. 
This is an absolutely epic underwater find that has researchers scrambling to this part of the globe to learn about this incredibly beautiful Egyptian city.
The fact that this city found underwater has been left untouched underwater for so many years is an amazing factor on its own let alone being a find as big as it truly is. These statues and artifacts are massive and nearly perfectly preserved.
The attention to detail in these pieces is truly beautiful and I’m happy to see it being preserved with great care.

viernes, 12 de agosto de 2016

The cells of higher organisms are stabilized by an internal skeleton, known as the cytoskeleton, which is made up of several families of proteins that form fibrous polymers.

Random walk into captivity
Proteins move diffusively along the microtubules. Credit: C. Hohmann, NIM
The cell's internal skeleton undergoes constant restructuring. LMU physicists now show that its constituent proteins can be efficiently transported to their sites of action by diffusion – provided they can be arrested when they get there.
The cells of higher organisms are stabilized by an internal skeleton, known as the cytoskeleton, which is made up of several families of proteins that form fibrous polymers. Members of one of these families polymerize to form so-called , which are essential for many cellular processes. To perform its many functions adequately, the cytoskeleton undergoes constant, dynamic restructuring under the influence of an array of regulatory proteins which, for instance, regulate the polymerization and depolymerization of the subunits that make up the microtubules. With the aid of a new theoretical model, researchers led by LMU biophysicist Erwin Frey have come up with a mechanism that allows these proteins to be efficiently transported to their sites of action. Their findings are reported in the journal Physical Review Letters.
Restructuring of existing microtubules requires binding of the appropriate regulatory proteins to either end of these polymers. – Given that microtubules are far larger than their modulators and consist of thousands of internal subunits to which the latter could potentially bind, finding the right end is no easy task. "Experimental studies of two such proteins have shown that they move diffusively – in other words, at random – along the microtubules," says Emanuel Reithmann, first author of the new paper. "With the aid of simulations based on our new theoretical model, we have been able to reproduce the experimental data very successfully, and our analyses also demonstrate that diffusive motion actually helps the regulatory proteins to reach the right end of the polymer."
But diffusion is not the whole story. A second factor plays the really crucial role: The proteins must be actively persuaded to put a halt to their diffusive wanderings at the end of the microtubule, i.e., they must allow themselves to be captured. Without some mode of capture at the end of the tubule, the protein misses its stop, and the positive effect of the diffusive motion is lost. Theoretical considerations suggest that energy is required to bring freely diffusing particles to a halt. "We therefore assume that contact with the end of the polymer triggers a reaction, which most probably requires the input of energy to alter the structure of the  so that they can be trapped," Reithmann explains. "This hypothesis can now be further tested experimentally in order to get a better grasp of microtubular dynamics." The researchers believe that their model should also be applicable to other types of regulatory molecules – such as DNA-binding proteins. The approach also yields new insights that are of general relevance to physical systems that are not in thermal equilibrium. – The dynamics of such non-equilibrium systems constitutes one the most active areas of investigation in modern theoretical physics.
More information: Emanuel Reithmann et al. Nonequilibrium Diffusion and Capture Mechanism Ensures Tip Localization of Regulating Proteins on Dynamic Filaments,Physical Review Letters (2016). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.078102


Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-08-random-captivity.html#jCp